I previously blogged about the importance of using daily reports to prove construction claims

In addition to daily reports, the following records should be prepared and maintained in the normal course of business to help prove claims and effectively manage the project:

  • Correspondence file containing all correspondence relating to a specific claim, including letters

Today’s guest post is from my good friend and law partner, M. Clark Spoden, who focuses on business litigation, labor and employment, environmental and construction law. The full article was published by Construction Executive. You can contact Clark at clark.spoden@stites.com.

Last April, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued

You don’t need to go any further than this Washington Post article to read about a delayed construction project where the parties are passing blame back and forth.  The Silver Spring Transit Center is reported to be two years behind schedule and suffering from significant cost increases. No doubt the dispute will be resolved in

It almost goes without saying that if you have to pursue or defend a delay claim, you are going to need some evidence (whether by expert or otherwise) to establish or to challenge entitlement to the damages sought. Today’s post identifies some best practices in this area.
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I recently spoke to a group of highway contractors about disadvantaged business enterprise (DBE) laws and regulations and some of the different policies among the state departments of transportation.  Did you know that in FYI 2010, special agents with USDOT’s Office of Inspector General (DOT-OIG) were responsible for 92 indictments, 72 convictions and over $18