You don’t always say what you mean. And you don’t always mean what you say.  In construction contracts, parties attempt to use plain and ordinary words to describe their respective obligations.

As an example, when the parties use the word “shall” in their agreement, they generally understand that the obligation specified is mandatory. Or

When it comes to identifying the best mediators in the country, Tony Piazza and Eric Green are at the top of the list.  And, on October 8, 2015, they will be sharing the stage in Austin, Texas for the Construction ADR Summit (pdf) sponsored by the American Bar Association’s Forum on Construction Law.

tony and eric

The

The past week has been one of sweeping changes. (…no comment…)  But one set of non-controversial changes is the Revised Construction Industry Arbitration and Mediation Procedures released by the American Arbitration Association.

change2

The Rules, which take effect July 1, 2015, can be downloaded here.  The major revisions include:

  • A mediation step for

Happy Birthday to You! Happy Birthday to You! Happy Birthday Dear AAA Supplementary Rules! Happy Birthday to you!

One year ago, the American Arbitration Association implemented new rules to provide an arbitration process that would be more predictable in terms of time and cost. The Supplementary Rules for Fixed Time and Cost Construction

Sometimes it is a race to the courthouse and dispute resolution for construction disputes can take many forms: litigation, mediation, arbitration, med-arb, dispute review boards, flip-a-coin, etc. Every now and then, I will review a construction contract where one of the parties . . . “at its sole option” . . . has the right

I’ve blogged about arbitration in construction disputes on numerous occasions.  Just like any other construction contract dispute, the resolution in arbitration often comes down to the language used in the parties’ agreement.  This is especially true when the gateway question is: Who decides whether the dispute is arbitrable—the court or the arbitrator?

In Massachusetts Highway

Who knew that dispute resolution was a lot like ordering from a menu?  Would you like one arbitrator or a panel of three arbitrators?  Would you like your jurisdictional questions to be determined by the court or the arbitrator?  Which arbitration rules do you want to apply?  So many choices . . .

Do you want a "reasoned award" in arbitration?

Recently, the American Arbitration Association revised and

You don’t always say what you mean. And you don’t always mean what you say. 

In construction contracts, parties attempt to use plain and ordinary words to describe their respective obligations. For example, when the parties use the word “shall” in their agreement, they generally understand that the obligation specified is mandatory. Or when parties use the