Last year around this time, I blogged about a new report indicating that half of the construction industry was using building information modeling (BIM) on their projects.  Last week, the BIM community lit up in response to an article by Nadine Post, which was featured in both Engineering News-Record and Architectural Record.

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I have my Google reader set to search various blogs, news sites, and Twitter feeds to help me keep current with the latest trends in the construction industry.  There remains one major problem: the words we use have different meanings for everyone.  

Google and BIM

Take, for example, my search of Twitter feeds (above) for Building Information Modeling (BIM).  If you were to do

Budgets are being cut left and right.  Our family "eating out" budget … gone!  Our community organization "summer party" budget … gone!  I see non-profit organizations struggling to keep pace with last year’s donations, while attendance at professional industry conferences are shrinking.

Construction Industry Rebound? Is that a Bull?

You can imagine my surprise when I read a press release from CADD Microsystems

In July 2009, Wisconsin (through its Division of State Facilities) became the first state to require BIM on large public projectsThe details were highlighted in a previous post.

Yesterday, the Texas Facilities Commission (TFC) announced its adoption of BIM for state design and construction projects.  The state has diligently worked to standardize the use of BIM

I know that title sounds odd. Before you start flooding my email box with comments about the practicality of Building Information Modeling (BIM) or the utility of social networking like Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn in the construction industry, consider the life of the personal computer:

Were you around in the 1980s during the microcomputer wars between Commodore,